Principal's Update Term 2 Week 7

Thursday, 09 Jun 2022
But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not consider his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. The Lord does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.”
— 1 Samuel 16:7

End of Semester 1 is fast approaching and there is much to celebrate. In the last few weeks, the students have achieved highly in so many areas. I wanted, however, to focus on our Performing Arts students as we are currently in the middle of Estidfods and we have hundreds of students involved in Voice, Instrumental, Drama, Ensemble and Dance categories. 

Beyond the Classroom - Performing Arts

Being a parent of a child who is growing into their performing arts talent is not an easy job. It’s a massive commitment for your child, for you and for the whole family - not just in time, but financially, and mentally and emotionally as well. This section of the newsletter I wanted to recognise the parents, and the tutors and teachers for going above and beyond with their performers. I also wish to recognise the growth of our BDC performing arts students across all the performance domains.  

Australian Honours Ensemble Program

Three BDC students have been selected via audition in the Australian Honours Ensemble Program for 2022 - Olivia Hoare (Double Bass), Marisol Taylor (Violin) and Scott Camble (Clarinet).

Zoya Dryburg, violinist, has also been selected in the Qld State Honours Ensemble Program.

Schools Instrumental Eisteddfod

Primary Schools - One Piece - 25 students - Highly Commended - BDC Superstrings
High Schools - One Piece - 5-25 students - Highly Commended - BDC Highly Strung
Year 9/10 Music Class Group - Highly Commended - BDC World Options
Year 11/12 Music Class Group - Highly Commended - BDC Year 12

Piano Eisteddfod 

Piano Solo - 7 years and under - 1st place - Theo Williams (year 2); 2nd place - Dev Chavan (year 2)
Piano Duets - 8 years and unde - 1st place - Claude Taylor and Lance Benson (year 3)
Piano Solo - 9 years and under - 1st place - Callum Walraven (year 3); 2nd place - Claude Taylor (year 3); 3rd place - Sofia Bravo (year 5); Highly Commended - Lance Benson (year 3)
Piano Solo - 9 years and under - Baroque or Classical Period solo- 1st place - Claude Taylor (year 3); 2nd place - Callum Walraven (year 3); Highly Commended - Lance Benson (year 3) and Sofia Bravo (year 5)
Piano Solo - 12 years and Under - Novice Solo- 1st place - Oliver Day (year 5)
Piano Solo - 12 years and under- 3rd place - Sophia Walraven (year 5)
Piano Solo - 12 Years and under - Baroque- 1st place - Sophia Walrven (year 5)
Piano Duets - 10 Years and under- 1st place - Sophia Walraven and Sofia Bravo (year 5)
Piano Solo - 15 years and under- 1st place - Joshua Walraven (year 8)
Piano Solos - 15 Years and under -Music from a Musical, Film or Television- 1st place - Hannah Gallagher (year 8)
Piano Solo - Preliminary grade List A - 2nd place - Lance Benson (year 3)
Piano Solo - Preliminary and Grade 1- list B- HC - Lance Benson (year 3)
Preliminary and Grade 1 - List C - 2nd place - Lance Benson (year 3)
Piano Solos Grade 2,3 and 4 - List A - 1st place - Sofia Bravo (year 5); 2nd place - Hannah Gallagher (year 8); HC - Felix Benson (year 5); HC - Claude Taylor (year 3)
Piano Solos- Grade 2,3,4  - list B - 1st place - Sofia Bravo (year 5); 2nd place - Callum Walraven (year 3); 3rd place - Claude Taylor (year 3); HC - Felix Benson (year 5); HC - Rhu Graham (year 4)
Piano Solos - Grade 2, 3 and 4 - 1st place - Sofia Bravo (year 5); HC - Felix Benson (year 5)
Piano Solos Grade 5, 6 and 7 - List A - 1st place - Julius Taylor (year 7); HC - Amelie Howard (year 8); HC - Sophia Walraven (year 5)
Piano Solo Grade 5,6 and 7- List B - 1st place - Julius Taylor (year 7); HC - Connor Nathan (year 8)
Piano Solos 5,6 and 7- List D - 1st place - Amelia Howard (year 8); HC - Connor Nathan (year 8)
Piano Solos Grade 8 and above - List B - Tilley Howard (year 11)
Piano Solos Grade 8 and above -List D - 1st place - Joshua Walraven (year 8); 2nd place - Tilly Howard (year 11)
Piano Championship Section - 12 years and under - 1st place - Sophia Walraven (year 5); 2nd place - Callum Walraven (year 3); HC - Claude Taylor (year 3)
Piano Championship Sections - 16 years and under - 1st place - Joshua Walraven (year 8); 2nd place - Tilly Howard (year 11); HC - Julius Taylor (year 7)

Major Piano Awards

Open Piano Championship - Helen Nevell (BDC Alumni)
16 Years and Under Piano Championship : Joshua Walraven (year 8)
12 Years and Under Piano Championship : Sophia Walraven (year 5)
Most Promising Baroque: Julius Taylor (year 7)
12 Years and Over Encouragement Award: Amelie Howard (year 8)
12 Years and Under Encouragement Award: Rhu Graham (year 4)
12 Years and Under Highest Aggregate in any 3 Sections: Sofia Bravo (year 5)
13 Years and over Highest Aggregate in any 3 sections: Helen Nevell (BDC Alumni)

Drama Eisteddfod

Individual Performance Monologue A: 1st place: Kiara Searle; 2nd place: Emily Hodges; 3rd place: Emily Biltris
Individual Performance Monologue B: 1st place: Eibhlin Keefe; 3rd place: Imogen Grebert; HC: Kate Clerkin 
Individual Performances Monologue C: 1st place: Teo Ross
Best Individual Performer overall: Eibhlin Keefe

Schools Choir

Primary Schools Year 3-6 Choir (max 50 students) - 3rd place - Primary Performance Choir

Once again thank you to all of our performing arts teachers and tutors who have supported our students in this year’s Eisteddfod. We have Dance Eisteddfod on Friday with over 130 students involved from our Dance Academy, Dance classes and Dance Clubs. 

Beyond the Classroom 

North Region TAFE Excellence Awards - 2021 Graduate, Maxyn Dorz, completed a successful HSC program as well as studying for a Certificate III in Screen and Media. She received the regional honours for both VET in Schools student of the year and Creative Design and Ideation Student of the Year. The North region TAFE NSW Excellence Awards celebrate the academic achievement of students and draw from a pool of thousands of candidates from the Hunter to Kingscliff.

A Good Night’s Sleep

Sleep is our primary source of recovery and should be held in very high regard when it comes to ensuring our health and our families’ health. We all know how we feel if we don’t get enough sleep. Tired, lethargic, and unmotivated. If we have repeated nights of insufficient rest, fatigue will build and build until you become sick and unable to engage in regular day-to-day activities.

Nights where we have a bad sleep are inevitable. It is normal for our sleep to suffer when we are stressed at work, at home, have a newborn, or for many other reasons. If it can be avoided, try not to engage in any high intensity exercise on days when you are not adequately rested. Try to listen to your body in these situations. Develop good physical awareness and body honesty to help you notice how you’re waking up every day. Pay attention to your body and be honest with yourself – if you need to rest, do so.

Sleeping well means getting enough sleep. How much sleep is enough varies among people? The number of hours you sleep is not as important as how you feel when you wake up. If you do not feel refreshed, you probably need more sleep.

Poor sleep can affect emotional and social interaction and increase risk of developing disease and depression. Make sure to get a good night’s rest where possible.

Top tips for a good night sleep: 

  • Sleep is our best source of recovery. Sufficient sleep boosts our immunity, muscular recovery, and cognitive function. Make sure to rest adequately after restless sleep.
  • Be aware of your own body – listen to your body. Notice how much rest and recovery you are getting. Pay attention to your body and its signs. Neglect can lead to injury. Ensure you are getting at least 6 hours of a sleep a night.
  • Be consistent and maintain a routine and rhythm. Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. Set a good example and get the kids in the routine too.
  • Ensure you spend time in natural light. This helps to promote melatonin production in the body which tells you when to sleep and when to wake up.
  • Reduce blue light exposure in the evening. Blue light from electronic devices tricks your brain into thinking it’s still daytime which impacts your sleep.
  • Find time to relax and clear your mind before sleep. For example, read a book, listen to relaxing music, deep breathing, or meditation.

Source: The Fathering Project November 2021

Nick Johnstone
Principal